maryandleo

Tumbling in Albany, NY, USA

Posts tagged kurosawa

Nov 6

Setsuko Hara — No Regrets for Our Youth Tribute


Jun 25

May 9
“Let’s put this film in proper perspective. Do you remember the adorable kids, two brothers in Ozu’s “I Was Born But…”? Take one of them, say, the elder brother, let him grow older, let him have a sweet girlfriend, put him in soldiers uniform, send him to South Pacific islands or Indochina, let him fight against Americans or Australians, let him starve for a year or two, and let him survive. The war is over. He is now back in Japan. Here is your guy in this film. What happened to his salary-man father and gentle mother? Remember what he says to his sweet girlfriend? “You are the only one I have in this whole world.” Yes, his parents were killed (probably by air raid) and his brother was also killed in action.” Vermillion and One Nights, Postwar Kurosawa: One Wonderful Sunday.

May 6

Clip of filming of Akira Kurosawa’s No Regrets for Our Youth (1946), starring Setsuko Hara


May 4
Vermillion and One Nights, Postwar Kurosawa: No Regrets for Our Youth.

Vermillion and One Nights, Postwar Kurosawa: No Regrets for Our Youth.


Apr 5

Ernie K:

This photograph of Japan’s most famous actress was signed by her in 1946, during a break in the filming of her only 1946 movie—No Regrets for Our Youth.

I was in the Army and touring Japan with some buddies at the time, and came across some buildings that I recognized to be Motion Picture studios. (I grew up in L. A.).

We went in—no signs, and no security, and we witnessed an actual scene being shot.

During the break, I told the young lady that I was from Los Angeles, and, since Hollywood is part of L. A., she showed some interest.

I had learned Japanese language (Nihongo) at the University of Minnesota. So, when I came upon her movie-making, we conversed in both a little English and my broken Japanese.

I asked her for her autograph, and she obliged—in Romaji, as you can see.

Miss Hara signed on the back of the picture because we were afraid that the signature wouldn’t show up very well against the black dress.

The scene they were shooting was one of the last scenes in the movie, as I recall.

An actor was kissing her goodbye, but since the Japanese of the day did not approve kissing in public or onscreen, they “kissed”, being silhouetted behind an umbrella.

I never saw the movie, so I don’t know if the scene was ever used.

Miss Hara still resides in Kamakura—I’ve often wondered if she would remember that afternoon when some touring GIs came across her film-making, and, if they ever remembered that day—

The photo is in black and white—some age showing—and measures nearly 3.5 inches x 5.25 inches.


Apr 4
Looking at someone to emulate.  Gift from J&EK.  See also Signed by Setsuko Hara.

Looking at someone to emulate.  Gift from J&EK.  See also Signed by Setsuko Hara.


Mar 24
Zelda Was a Writer, The word “Hope” caught my eye.

Zelda Was a Writer, The word “Hope” caught my eye.


Mar 23
David Blakeslee, No Regrets for Our Youth

David Blakeslee, No Regrets for Our Youth


Mar 21
Signed Setsuko Hara.  The photograph is now had been on sale on eBay for $999 $899.  The ad tells the story of its signing in 1946 on the set of Akira Kurosawa’s No Regrets for Our Youth (Waga seishun ni kuinashi). The photographer is not identified, but Hara is wearing the same dress in Setsuko Hara, from The Pacific War Photographs of PFc Glenn W. Eve.  See also Looking at someone to emulate.

Signed Setsuko Hara.  The photograph is now had been on sale on eBay for $999 $899.  The ad tells the story of its signing in 1946 on the set of Akira Kurosawa’s No Regrets for Our Youth (Waga seishun ni kuinashi). The photographer is not identified, but Hara is wearing the same dress in Setsuko Hara, from The Pacific War Photographs of PFc Glenn W. Eve.  See also Looking at someone to emulate.


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